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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are my alternatives to bankruptcy?”

There are many considerations that go into filing for bankruptcy. As we’ve discussed many times before, you have to be sure that bankruptcy is right for you and, even if it is, that this is the right time to move forward. Something you may not think much about is how residency can impact your ability to file for bankruptcy. To learn more about where the law allows you to file for bankruptcy, keep reading.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

When you think of the world of professional athletes and their net worth, the term “bankruptcy” is probably not one that comes to mind. Between the multi-million dollar salaries and lucrative endorsement deals, it is hard to imagine that someone raking in that kind of dough would be able to spend it all, let alone need to seek bankruptcy protection. So when NHL player Jack Johnson announced that he was filing for bankruptcy in 2014, claiming more than $10 million in debt, it stunned those within the hockey world. The lenders reported that interest from those loans had accrued his total amount owed to $21 million.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 13 bankruptcy?”

A recent article in Bloomberg discussed something that many people may not be aware of: racial bias may play a role in something as mundane as bankruptcy filings. How does race impact bankruptcy? According to several studies, minority groups, specifically African American debtors, are vastly more likely to be steered to Chapter 13 rather than Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Will I lose my property if I file for bankruptcy?”

The past week has been a tough one for the “Nasty Women” of the world, and not just Hillary Clinton supporters.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are my alternatives to bankruptcy?”

Deciding to file for bankruptcy protection is a big step and one that can cause a lot of stress for the person trying to decide whether to take the plunge. Given the importance of the decision, it’s a good idea to be sure that you’ve taken sufficient time to think before moving forward. The following are some things worth keeping in mind as you consider filing for bankruptcy protection.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I keep my house if I file bankruptcy?”

We’ve previously discussed the impact that filing bankruptcy can have on some items of personal property, including things like houses and cars. As we mentioned, what and how much you’re able to hold on to typically depends on the type of bankruptcy filed, the value of the items in question and what the bankruptcy exemption rules say on the subject. Another item many people are curious about is jewelry. Whether it’s a family heirloom or a wedding ring, these items can have special sentimental value and the prospect of having to part with them can be very upsetting. To learn more about how jewelry is dealt with in bankruptcy, keep reading.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 13 bankruptcy?”

It probably comes as no surprise that the automobile parts manufacturer responsible for what became the industry’s largest global recall is now reportedly considering a bankruptcy filing for its U.S. subsidiary.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 13 bankruptcy?”

One year ago this December, the paperwork that had been in use since the 1980s for people and businesses filing for bankruptcy protection was replaced with forms that were supposed to be clearer and easier to understand.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are my alternatives to bankruptcy?”

Anyone with a job understands that if you get paid you must pay taxes on what you earn. The same thing goes for those who receive other material benefits, even if it isn’t a paycheck, some tax must be paid for the benefit you received. An example of a situation where tax can be owed despite no cash changing hands is when a loan is forgiven. If a credit card company decided to settle a $25,000 debt for $15,000, you would need to report the difference, $10,000, on your taxes. Not only would you need to report the $10,000, but you’d be required to pay tax on the value of the loan that was forgiven. This leads to a question about the debt discharged in a bankruptcy. Do you have to pay tax on that too?

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are North Carolina’s exemptions?”

Charles Jones may have made his living reselling textbooks, but his resulting bankruptcy case is turning out to be anything but a textbook one.