Articles Posted in Bankruptcy Procedure

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are the pros and cons of bankruptcy?”

While the economy has recovered somewhat since the “Great Recession” and housing market crash of 2007, millions of Americans are still struggling to pay the bills. For starters, health care costs have drastically risen in the last decade as prescription medication and premiums seem to double in price every few years; fewer Americans own homes now than they did before the housing crash; and the median net worth of families today is just $97,300, which is 30% less than the average in 2007, which was $140,000, according to Vice News. If you are worried about your gloomy financial state of affairs, you should consider talking to an attorney about your best options for getting out of the hole in which you are currently stuck. Filing for bankruptcy could be the right move, or it could seriously jeopardize your future. A Charlotte bankruptcy attorney will be able to provide you with assistance today.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Should I file bankruptcy?”

In any lawyer/client relationship, you have to feel comfortable with your representation. Bankruptcy is a stressful and complicated process. You should have no difficulty in asking your attorney questions, requesting explanations, and needing to go over your options during the course of your case. Strategy and filing deadlines are important in bankruptcy. For instance, the decision to file under Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 for individuals will determine the time-frame, which debts are discharged, and what kinds of property they will be able to keep.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Do I need an attorney to file bankruptcy?”

It the vast majority of cases, people who are considering filing for bankruptcy are experiencing significant financial problems. After all, bankruptcy is intended to benefit people who have fallen behind on their debts and are unable to meet their financial obligations. As a result, most bankruptcy filers are trying to save money at every opportunity that presents itself, and many people wonder if they even need to retain an attorney in order to file.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are the pros and cons of bankruptcy?”

Bankruptcy is an option for Americans to discharge their debts and set themselves up to have a better financial future. We live in a world in which a person’s credit history can dictate some important parts of their lives. Credit scores impact your ability to rent an apartment, buy a house, and even secure a credit card to have in the event of an emergency. Filing for bankruptcy will affect a person’s credit score; there is no way to avoid it. However, a misconception surrounding bankruptcy is that there is no way to rebuild credit after filing for bankruptcy or that the process takes too long. There are ways to rebuild your credit in an efficient and timely manner.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Are my 401k and IRA protected in bankruptcy?”

Normally, arbitration comes up in the context of personal injury cases. A good example is one of the most common instances of arbitration language, which is in nursing home admittance paperwork. The nursing homes include language requiring arbitration, which shields the nursing home from the public, lengthy, expensive and uncertain courtroom litigation process and instead allows them much greater control by requiring all potential plaintiffs to bring their disputes before an arbitrator. This has come under attack in recent years, as many argue that arbitration clauses, especially arbitration clauses that restrict consumers, are unfair.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are North Carolina’s exemptions?”

When you think of emotional distress claims, you understandably think of them in a personal injury context. The term is almost always associated with car accidents or workplace injures, something where someone also suffers physical harmed. Though it’s true that emotional distress exists primarily in the personal injury world, a recent case decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit demonstrates that emotional distress can sometimes involve bankruptcy proceedings.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are my alternatives to bankruptcy?”

It’s an issue that almost no one pays attention to until you need it: the smooth functioning of the bankruptcy system. Though it seldom grabs headlines, it’s important nonetheless. Recent reports reveal that a number of bankruptcy judgeships are in danger of being eliminated, something that could wreak havoc across the country as a limited number of judges are forced to contend with a massive amount of complicated bankruptcy cases.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I keep my car if I file bankruptcy?”

Though no one enjoys the process of filing tax returns, the good news for many is that tax time usually involves a tax refund, providing a nice chunk of change that can be used for other things. For some, this means taking money and splurging on a treat or a vacation. For others, it means paying bills. For another group, it means taking the money and using it to pay bankruptcy fees, escaping debt that has proven too big to maneuver.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

Though he may wish it weren’t so, the reality is that one of the many things President Trump is known for is the comfort and frequency with which he avails himself of the country’s bankruptcy system. Having filed for corporate bankruptcy protection multiple times (though there’s some dispute, most experts peg the number at 6), Trump certainly knows his way around the Bankruptcy Code. Given his penchant for filing for bankruptcy protection, many have been surprised that one of increases in his recently proposed budget targets others who seek to do the same by increasing bankruptcy filing fees.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Will anyone find out about my bankruptcy?”

It’s a favorite of the media: coverage of financial difficulties for celebrities (and sometimes, semi-celebrities). We love watching them fly high and, so it seems, love watching when they come crashing back down to earth. One issue that is assured to get media attention is when a celeb (or quasi celeb) goes into bankruptcy or, even worse, gets accused of bankruptcy fraud. There are several recent examples, including a few of the “Real Housewives”, the rapper 50 Cent and most recently, Abby Lee Miller, star of the reality TV show “Dance Moms”.