Articles Tagged with bankruptcy judge

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I get credit after filing personal bankruptcy?”

Those following business headlines have likely seen news of how hard hit brick-and-mortar retailers have been in recent years. Though consumers haven’t stopped spending, it does appear that their habits have changed, with far more dollars flowing through the internet than through traditional retail stores. This has led to a string of bankruptcies in the industry, including Aeropostale, RadioShack and American Apparel (which recently filed for the second time). Analysts say that in the coming month and years other big companies are expected to follow suit.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Will anyone find out about my bankruptcy?”

Bankruptcy judges are people too, in that in their free time, some like to occasionally relax at home and channel-surf.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Does Bankruptcy stop foreclosure?”

The Orange County probation department received a “scolding” this week from a federal court for hounding a California mother into bankruptcy and beyond to pay the $16,000 it said she owed them for incarcerating her son in a juvenile detention facility.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is a small business bankruptcy ?”

No, the top executives for the bankrupted Sports Authority do not have the authority to give themselves $2.85 million in bonuses, the company’s U.S. bankruptcy judge has ruled.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?”

Erin Andrews was recently in the news for her successful lawsuit against her stalker and a Nashville hotel where a video of her undressing was secretly recorded through her room’s peep hole. Andrews, the famous sports personality, launched her legal claim in an attempt to hold those responsible for causing her harm financially accountable for their actions. When the judgment was handed down for a whopping $55 million, it was clear she had accomplished what she set out to do.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is the means test?”

A Clinton County, Illinois farmer whose bankruptcy fraud case became intertwined with a double murder in 2007 was released from prison this April to a prison-sanctioned halfway house.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are the pros and cons of bankruptcy?”

The rapper 50 Cent has been in the news a lot recently, all related to troubles surrounding his pending bankruptcy petition. Thankfully, he may finally get himself off the front page, at least as it relates to his financial affairs.

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Do I need an attorney to file bankruptcy?”

When a United States Bankruptcy Judge enters an order, the order must be honored unless and until it is stayed pending appeal, or reversed or set aside by an appellate court. Two Missouri lawyers and their law firm are finding that out the hard way, according to Joe Patrice, writing at AboveTheLaw.com.

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What is a small business bankruptcy ?”

For years, retail chains have been collecting customer data to use for marketing, advertising and a host of other reasons that have nothing to do with consumers and everything to do with profiting off their information.

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Will I lose my property if I file for bankruptcy ?”

 

Bankruptcy observers say if United States Bankruptcy Judge Robert C. Drain’s August ruling in the Chapter 11 bankruptcy of Momentive Performance Materials Inc. holds up, it could dramatically alter the playing field for debtors and even junior creditors who seek to restructure debts held by senior lenders at so-called cram-down interest rates.

NYC Courthouse Charlotte Debt Lawyer North Carolina Bankruptcy AttorneyCram-down interest rates are interest rates that are considered below market value. In the Momentive bankruptcy, the debtor—Momentive—crafted a reorganization plan that would pay senior lien holders “with new long-term debt, at below-market interest rates,” according to Law 360.

The senior lien holders had an opportunity to accept a cash-out option and fight the restructuring plan, but turned it down. Momentive sought to enforce the restructuring plan, and in August, Judge Drain ruled that the senior lien holders could be paid based on the so-called “Till rate.”

The “Till rate” was formulated in a 2004 Supreme Court case that involved an individual debtor. Momentive marks the first time that the “Till rate” was adopted in a corporate Chapter 11 bankruptcy. In the Momentive case, the effect of the ruling on senior lien holders was dramatic. Immediately after the decision, the senior lien holders lost as much as $100 million in trading value on their Momentive notes.

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