Articles Tagged with bankruptcy protection

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are my alternatives to bankruptcy?”

We like to think that when someone takes the big step of filing for bankruptcy, they do so only when it’s absolutely necessary. The bankruptcy process was created to offer relief to individuals struggling with burdensome debt loads, not to be abused by those simply trying to stall creditors. Though the vast majority of those who file for bankruptcy protection do so as a last resort to avoid financial disaster, there are some who take advantage of aspects of the system for their own benefit.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “I’m owed money by someone that filed bankruptcy. What can I do now?”

Most people understandably assume that if you own a business, whatever it is, you have the ability to seek bankruptcy protection if the need should arise. After all, the bankruptcy code doesn’t allow for judgments on the societal value of the business, all companies are seen as equally able to seek the protection of the bankruptcy system.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

Though he may wish it weren’t so, the reality is that one of the many things President Trump is known for is the comfort and frequency with which he avails himself of the country’s bankruptcy system. Having filed for corporate bankruptcy protection multiple times (though there’s some dispute, most experts peg the number at 6), Trump certainly knows his way around the Bankruptcy Code. Given his penchant for filing for bankruptcy protection, many have been surprised that one of increases in his recently proposed budget targets others who seek to do the same by increasing bankruptcy filing fees.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I get credit after filing personal bankruptcy?”

When a person files for bankruptcy protection one of the first things he or she must do is submit a list of assets and liabilities. The liabilities are obviously important because these are the debts that the petitioner is trying to get out from under. The assets, at least for the creditors and the bankruptcy trustee, are just as important. It’s the assets that can be sold and used to repay creditors and it’s crucial that the list be accurate and complete. In fact, the law requires debtors to list all assets and any failure to do so, assuming it’s deliberate, can result in serious criminal penalties.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is a bankruptcy discharge ?”

Early this month the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on a case that The New York Times reported has the bankruptcy world “on edge” because it could upend the standard practice that ranks lenders, employees and other creditors in order of priority when they try to recover what they are owed after a company files for bankruptcy.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

When you think of the world of professional athletes and their net worth, the term “bankruptcy” is probably not one that comes to mind. Between the multi-million dollar salaries and lucrative endorsement deals, it is hard to imagine that someone raking in that kind of dough would be able to spend it all, let alone need to seek bankruptcy protection. So when NHL player Jack Johnson announced that he was filing for bankruptcy in 2014, claiming more than $10 million in debt, it stunned those within the hockey world. The lenders reported that interest from those loans had accrued his total amount owed to $21 million.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 13 bankruptcy?”

A recent article in Bloomberg discussed something that many people may not be aware of: racial bias may play a role in something as mundane as bankruptcy filings. How does race impact bankruptcy? According to several studies, minority groups, specifically African American debtors, are vastly more likely to be steered to Chapter 13 rather than Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are my alternatives to bankruptcy?”

Deciding to file for bankruptcy protection is a big step and one that can cause a lot of stress for the person trying to decide whether to take the plunge. Given the importance of the decision, it’s a good idea to be sure that you’ve taken sufficient time to think before moving forward. The following are some things worth keeping in mind as you consider filing for bankruptcy protection.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are my alternatives to bankruptcy?”

Many people considering filing for bankruptcy protection lack information about the process. This is understandable given that most people filing for bankruptcy have never filed before and are thus totally unfamiliar with how the system operates. Someone with only passing knowledge might think that all a person needs to do is decide to file and fill out some paperwork and before you know it the bankruptcy is over and done. Sadly, there are many more steps along the road that must be navigated before reaching the desired conclusion. Thankfully, skilled bankruptcy attorneys are here to help guide the way.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I keep my house if I file bankruptcy?”

Thanks to the concepts of equity and the Homestead Exemption, keeping your home during and after a bankruptcy is not only possible, but a popular option for individuals who file for bankruptcy protection. However, if you choose to stay in your home after bankruptcy it is important to understand the concept of reaffirming a mortgage and its pros and cons. Your mortgage lender will almost certainly ask you to reaffirm, and having a grip on what reaffirming is, its pros and cons, and what it ultimately means for you can better inform your decision.