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Articles Tagged with bankruptcy trends

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Are my 401k and IRA protected in bankruptcy?”

The University of Maryland, College Park is fighting in bankruptcy court to keep the $61,595.33 a now-bankrupt Connecticut couple paid the university. The couple’s son attended the university beginning in 2010. After making the tuition payments, the couple went bankrupt.

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What is Chapter 13 bankruptcy?”

 

Changes to the United States Bankruptcy Code enacted a decade ago were designed to lower the number of bankruptcy filings in the United States. Last year, bankruptcy filings were down about half from a decade ago, but bankruptcy experts wonder if the reforms “have done more harm than good,” according to The Economist.

Man at desk Local Bankruptcy Lawyer Charlotte Debt AttorneyAs a recent paper published by Stefania Albanesi of the New York Federal Reserve and Jaromir Nosal of Columbia University confirms, the decade-old bankruptcy reforms have “led to a permanent drop in the bankruptcy rate.”

However, Princeton assistant professor of Economics Will Dobbie and Jae Song of the Social Security Administration say that tightening bankruptcy rules may suppress the “good microeconomic effects” that easier bankruptcy rules produce. A bankrupt person has more incentive to work, for instance, if large chunks of one’s salary are not seized by creditors.

According to Dobbie and Song, people who were able to avail themselves of bankruptcy protection earned over $6,000 more in average income the year after declaring bankruptcy than those whose petitions were denied. Those whose petitions were denied, Dobbie and Song theorized, were more likely to “slip out of town, change [one’s] job and close down [one’s] bank account.”

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Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

 

The number of businesses that filed for bankruptcy in the State of Texas in 2014 declined by twenty percent compared with 2013, according to Androvett Legal Media. Business bankruptcy filings in the Lone Star State are down by more than half over the past five years.

Business 101 Mecklenburg Bankruptcy Lawyer North Carolina Chapter 7 AttorneyAs the United States’ economy sputtered into and out of recession in 2009 and after, the Lone Star State’s economy has boomed, leading some pundits to argue that Texas has been propping up the nation’s economy as a whole.

The state’s booming economy may be reducing bankruptcies, but it was not the booming economy that had a gathering of some 100 Energy Future Holdings advisers gasping in a boardroom last month. The gasps followed the revelation by former American Airlines general counsel Gary Kennedy that the airline’s daily legal bills in its recent bankruptcy ran to about $500,000 per day. Kennedy said businesses should seek alternatives to bankruptcy because, he said, the costs of a business bankruptcies have spiraled out of control.

Martin Sosland, a partner at Weil, Gotshal & Manges—a Dallas, Texas-based law firm—did not dispute that business bankruptcies can be expensive, but he cited the American Airlines bankruptcy as a perfect example of how a Chapter 11 proceeding can help a struggling business “restructure debt, renegotiate union contracts,” and merge or consolidate business operations in a manner that returns the business to profitability. Sosland said the airline’s creditors were paid 100 cents on the dollar and that American’s stock skyrocketed from 31 cents at the time of the bankruptcy filing to over $50 today.

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