Articles Tagged with Bankruptcy

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

The current Supreme Court, according to many critics, strongly leans in favor of big business, often at the expense of the little guy. Though the Court may have a well-established reputation as being friendly to corporations, a recent ruling proves that this isn’t always the case. In a recent ruling, Czyzewski et al., v. Jevic Holding Corp., the Court voted 6-2 in favor of individuals, rejecting claims by a New Jersey trucking company. To learn more about the bankruptcy case, keep reading.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Do I need an attorney to file bankruptcy?”

If you’re considering filing for bankruptcy you likely have a number of questions running through your head. Unfortunately, the process is often seen as opaque and this lack of clarity can scare people off who might really stand to benefit. In the interest of full disclosure, lets spend a few moments walking through some common questions about the limits of bankruptcy.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Will anyone find out about my bankruptcy?”

It’s a favorite of the media: coverage of financial difficulties for celebrities (and sometimes, semi-celebrities). We love watching them fly high and, so it seems, love watching when they come crashing back down to earth. One issue that is assured to get media attention is when a celeb (or quasi celeb) goes into bankruptcy or, even worse, gets accused of bankruptcy fraud. There are several recent examples, including a few of the “Real Housewives”, the rapper 50 Cent and most recently, Abby Lee Miller, star of the reality TV show “Dance Moms”.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I get credit after filing personal bankruptcy?”

When a person files for bankruptcy protection one of the first things he or she must do is submit a list of assets and liabilities. The liabilities are obviously important because these are the debts that the petitioner is trying to get out from under. The assets, at least for the creditors and the bankruptcy trustee, are just as important. It’s the assets that can be sold and used to repay creditors and it’s crucial that the list be accurate and complete. In fact, the law requires debtors to list all assets and any failure to do so, assuming it’s deliberate, can result in serious criminal penalties.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I get rid of student loans by declaring bankruptcy?”

In one of the more ironic bankruptcy stories of the year, the filing by the parent company for ITT Technical Institutes has devolved into one of the most paper-heavy affairs imaginable.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I keep my car if I file bankruptcy?”

If you’re in the midst of tough financial times, it isn’t surprising that you might have to consider alternative ways of raising money. Though you may never have thought about pawning your property before, if you have bills that need to be paid it might be one of your only options. Once the item has been pawned you might not think much about it, but a recent bankruptcy case out of Georgia indicates that might not be the end of the story, especially if you want to try and get that property back.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

When you think of the world of professional athletes and their net worth, the term “bankruptcy” is probably not one that comes to mind. Between the multi-million dollar salaries and lucrative endorsement deals, it is hard to imagine that someone raking in that kind of dough would be able to spend it all, let alone need to seek bankruptcy protection. So when NHL player Jack Johnson announced that he was filing for bankruptcy in 2014, claiming more than $10 million in debt, it stunned those within the hockey world. The lenders reported that interest from those loans had accrued his total amount owed to $21 million.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are my alternatives to bankruptcy?”

Anyone with a job understands that if you get paid you must pay taxes on what you earn. The same thing goes for those who receive other material benefits, even if it isn’t a paycheck, some tax must be paid for the benefit you received. An example of a situation where tax can be owed despite no cash changing hands is when a loan is forgiven. If a credit card company decided to settle a $25,000 debt for $15,000, you would need to report the difference, $10,000, on your taxes. Not only would you need to report the $10,000, but you’d be required to pay tax on the value of the loan that was forgiven. This leads to a question about the debt discharged in a bankruptcy. Do you have to pay tax on that too?

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is a small business bankruptcy ?”

A shareholder of the identity verification startup company Jumio Inc. has sued Eduardo Saverin and other former top executives for grossly mismanaging the firm and driving it into bankruptcy.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I keep my house if I file bankruptcy?”

Thanks to the concepts of equity and the Homestead Exemption, keeping your home during and after a bankruptcy is not only possible, but a popular option for individuals who file for bankruptcy protection. However, if you choose to stay in your home after bankruptcy it is important to understand the concept of reaffirming a mortgage and its pros and cons. Your mortgage lender will almost certainly ask you to reaffirm, and having a grip on what reaffirming is, its pros and cons, and what it ultimately means for you can better inform your decision.