Articles Tagged with Chapter 11

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

Sears, Roebuck & Company, commonly known just as Sears, was founded following the Civil War. Since then, the company has grown and expanded, becoming a popular place for people to shop all across America. Sears has sold a wide variety of items through stores and catalogs, such as clothes, toys, appliances, and even tombstones. As time went on, more and more competition popped up, taking away some of Sears’ clientele. Stores like Walmart and Home Depot became difficult to compete with given their low prices. Additionally, online retailers like Amazon significantly cut into Sears’ customer base. With all of this competition and its decline in sales, Sears has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, according to the New York Times.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

Heritage Home Group, a High Point furniture manufacturer, has filed for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy, according to Business North Carolina. Heritage Home Group filed a Chapter 11 petition with the hope of restructuring the company. They also want to sell their brands, including Thomasville, Broyhill, Hickory Chair, and Maitland-Smith. The decision to file bankruptcy is the result of $280 million in debt that the company is facing. Sales were down 27% from the previous year’s sales. The company does anticipate any changes in their operation while the restructuring takes place.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

The current Supreme Court, according to many critics, strongly leans in favor of big business, often at the expense of the little guy. Though the Court may have a well-established reputation as being friendly to corporations, a recent ruling proves that this isn’t always the case. In a recent ruling, Czyzewski et al., v. Jevic Holding Corp., the Court voted 6-2 in favor of individuals, rejecting claims by a New Jersey trucking company. To learn more about the bankruptcy case, keep reading.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I get credit after filing personal bankruptcy?”

Most consumers never give much thought to the possibility that a store they shop at or a service they use could just up and disappear. We take for granted that established brands will always be around, when the reality is that companies come and go all the time. When a store is sold or changes names, consumers rarely suffer, as debts owed are almost always honored. The same isn’t true in the case of bankruptcy filings, which can leave consumers out money they mistakenly imagined was secure.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

When you think of the world of professional athletes and their net worth, the term “bankruptcy” is probably not one that comes to mind. Between the multi-million dollar salaries and lucrative endorsement deals, it is hard to imagine that someone raking in that kind of dough would be able to spend it all, let alone need to seek bankruptcy protection. So when NHL player Jack Johnson announced that he was filing for bankruptcy in 2014, claiming more than $10 million in debt, it stunned those within the hockey world. The lenders reported that interest from those loans had accrued his total amount owed to $21 million.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is a small business bankruptcy ?”

“Retailer’s dream” isn’t a phrase that one usually thinks about when it comes to bankruptcy. However, the surfwear retailer Pacific Sunwear of California Inc. (“PacSun”), who recently filed for Chapter 11 protection, has had its bankruptcy case described by Bloomberg analysts as a “distressed retailer’s dream.”

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

No one thinks bankruptcy is ideal, whether we’re talking on the personal or corporate level. In the case of a commercial bankruptcy, many people wonder what is the best way to go, either Chapter 7 or Chapter 11. Though neither represents the best possible outcome, filing for bankruptcy doesn’t have to be a disaster either and it’s worth weighing your options about which path forward offers the most benefits.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I get credit after filing personal bankruptcy?”

If you pay much attention to the news you’ve likely heard about Donald Trump and his past financial problems. Though Trump claims he’s a billionaire many times over, his opponents enjoy pointing out his repeated financial distress. The claim from rivals is that the man has filed for bankruptcy four times before. The argument often made is that because he presided over so many bankruptcies of his own, he shouldn’t be trusted to watch out for the financial security of a country far larger and more complex than any of his businesses.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “How do I file for bankruptcy?”

Once you have committed yourself to filing for bankruptcy in order to take control of your debt, it is one of the first questions you must next face: Where should I file? The question becomes necessarily more complex when a company is looking at filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy; it is inherently more difficult to determine a particular state of residence for corporations and other business models that have assets and conduct business in multiple states. However, where to file for bankruptcy, known in the legal world as “venue,” is also a common conundrum for individual consumers looking to file for Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

Published on:

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I get rid of student loans by declaring bankruptcy?”

A single mother with two young boys was only briefly able to imagine a future free of her crushing debt burden. Against all odds, the woman won her case before a bankruptcy court in Alabama. This victory, though short-lived, was a big accomplishment given how skeptical bankruptcy courts are when it comes to granting relief for student loan debt. Sadly, the educational lender appealed the decision and a district court reversed, meaning the single mother will again assume responsibility for her six figures in educational debt.