Articles Tagged with Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I get credit after filing personal bankruptcy?”

Most consumers never give much thought to the possibility that a store they shop at or a service they use could just up and disappear. We take for granted that established brands will always be around, when the reality is that companies come and go all the time. When a store is sold or changes names, consumers rarely suffer, as debts owed are almost always honored. The same isn’t true in the case of bankruptcy filings, which can leave consumers out money they mistakenly imagined was secure.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is a small business bankruptcy ?”

A cross-continental bankruptcy case recently cast some light on the ways in which representatives of non-citizen debtors can—and cannot—track down those who owe the debtors money.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 13 bankruptcy?”

One year ago this December, the paperwork that had been in use since the 1980s for people and businesses filing for bankruptcy protection was replaced with forms that were supposed to be clearer and easier to understand.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is a small business bankruptcy ?”

A shareholder of the identity verification startup company Jumio Inc. has sued Eduardo Saverin and other former top executives for grossly mismanaging the firm and driving it into bankruptcy.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is a small business bankruptcy ?”

“Retailer’s dream” isn’t a phrase that one usually thinks about when it comes to bankruptcy. However, the surfwear retailer Pacific Sunwear of California Inc. (“PacSun”), who recently filed for Chapter 11 protection, has had its bankruptcy case described by Bloomberg analysts as a “distressed retailer’s dream.”

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Should I file bankruptcy?”

If you’re considering filing for bankruptcy you have likely come to understand just how many technicalities and rules are part of the process. The system can often appear as if it were designed to be purposely complicated to dissuade people from filing in the first place. One aspect of the process you may not be familiar with is the “proof of claim” filed by creditors. To find out more about what a proof of claim is, keep reading.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I get credit after filing personal bankruptcy?”

If you pay much attention to the news you’ve likely heard about Donald Trump and his past financial problems. Though Trump claims he’s a billionaire many times over, his opponents enjoy pointing out his repeated financial distress. The claim from rivals is that the man has filed for bankruptcy four times before. The argument often made is that because he presided over so many bankruptcies of his own, he shouldn’t be trusted to watch out for the financial security of a country far larger and more complex than any of his businesses.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I buy a home after bankruptcy?”

Everyone knows that bankruptcy is a difficult process. One of the many difficult aspects of the bankruptcy process is deciding how to handle some of your personal property and corresponding debts. Vehicles are especially tricky given that you may not be able to afford the payments on the car, but may also fear being unable to make ends meet without it.

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Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can I get rid of student loans by declaring bankruptcy?”

Rapper Dee-1’s newly-released music video opens with a simple statement: “Student loan debt is out of control. In the U.S., over $1.2 trillion is owed in student loans.”

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question “Can I get rid of student loans by declaring bankruptcy?”

It’s long been understood that bankruptcy protections do not apply to the vast majority of student loan debt. The decision was made years ago to shield student lending companies from loss, meaning students are often locked into a lifetime of struggling to pay mounting school-related debts. A recent case out of a bankruptcy court in New York appears to chip away at that protection, at least in one rather limited circumstance.