Articles Tagged with Charlotte debt lawyer

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Will anyone find out about my bankruptcy?”

It’s a favorite of the media: coverage of financial difficulties for celebrities (and sometimes, semi-celebrities). We love watching them fly high and, so it seems, love watching when they come crashing back down to earth. One issue that is assured to get media attention is when a celeb (or quasi celeb) goes into bankruptcy or, even worse, gets accused of bankruptcy fraud. There are several recent examples, including a few of the “Real Housewives”, the rapper 50 Cent and most recently, Abby Lee Miller, star of the reality TV show “Dance Moms”.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I get credit after filing personal bankruptcy?”

Those following business headlines have likely seen news of how hard hit brick-and-mortar retailers have been in recent years. Though consumers haven’t stopped spending, it does appear that their habits have changed, with far more dollars flowing through the internet than through traditional retail stores. This has led to a string of bankruptcies in the industry, including Aeropostale, RadioShack and American Apparel (which recently filed for the second time). Analysts say that in the coming month and years other big companies are expected to follow suit.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I keep my house if I file bankruptcy?”

Thanks to the concepts of equity and the Homestead Exemption, keeping your home during and after a bankruptcy is not only possible, but a popular option for individuals who file for bankruptcy protection. However, if you choose to stay in your home after bankruptcy it is important to understand the concept of reaffirming a mortgage and its pros and cons. Your mortgage lender will almost certainly ask you to reaffirm, and having a grip on what reaffirming is, its pros and cons, and what it ultimately means for you can better inform your decision.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are my alternatives to bankruptcy?”

Last Week Tonight host John Oliver recently made headlines when he forgave nearly $15 million in medical debt for roughly 9,000 individuals in the “largest one-time giveaway in [TV] history.”

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?”

Most people think that when you file for bankruptcy you only get one shot, pick the right chapter to file under and you’re done. Though it’s true that some people only file under one chapter of the bankruptcy code, it is also true that it is possible to switch at some point in the process. This switching between various chapters is known as converting. To find out more about converting a bankruptcy filing, keep reading.

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What is the means test?”

The effect of getting a raise or losing your job after filing for bankruptcy depends on which type of personal bankruptcy you filed, and understanding what action to take is important. The temptation to not get around to reporting modest income increases, for example, can lead to your bankruptcy case getting thrown out of court, full responsibility for all debts and criminal fraud charges.

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Are my 401k and IRA protected in bankruptcy?”

A recent article in the Detroit News discussed the case of an attorney who had to advise a client not to file for bankruptcy despite a massive $400,000 mountain of debt. The reason? Because the man had recently inherited an IRA from his deceased mother. According to a recent U.S. Supreme Court case, the money contained in the IRA would not be protected during the bankruptcy process and would instead be forfeited to pay off creditors. Given the certain loss of the money, the man decided to avoid filing and continue struggling under an impossible debt burden.

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can I get credit after filing personal bankruptcy?”

Though financial matters are often seen as cold, calculating or rational, the reality is that emotions are often interwoven with many money decisions. This is never truer than when discussing filing for bankruptcy. Though it may seem like a clear-cut financial question, a matter of dollars and cents, these decisions can result in tremendous anxiety, guilt and even shame. Many people feel guilty about considering filing for bankruptcy and begin to believe they are trapped by the guilt. Today we explore the feelings of guilt surrounding bankruptcy that many people struggle with and the danger of letting these feelings dictate your choices.

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Do I need an attorney to file bankruptcy?”

Everyone knows that bankruptcy is a last resort. To file will cost money you money, take time and wreak havoc on your credit score, making it all but impossible to secure new loans or open new lines of credit in the short-term. Given these consequences, it wouldn’t make sense to consider filing for bankruptcy unless you had exhausted all other options.

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can I get credit after filing personal bankruptcy?”

Most people realize that co-signing on someone else’s loans has it risks, the person might not pay and you would then be stuck with the debt. But what happens if the person you asked to be your co-signer is having financial problems and ends up filing for bankruptcy? What will happen to you then? To find out more about what can happen when a co-signer files for bankruptcy protection, keep reading.