Articles Tagged with creditor

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I keep my car if I file bankruptcy?”

Everyone has heard that medical expenses are a major cause of bankruptcy filings, and it makes sense. A sudden medical emergency, especially for those without insurance, can be devastatingly expensive, sometimes costing hundreds of thousands of dollars. Another major factor in bankruptcy is job loss. You lose your income, it isn’t a surprise that you lose your ability to keep up with your bills. But what about parking tickets? Surely parking tickets aren’t a contributor to bankruptcy filings. According to some experts in Chicago, they might be.

Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are the pros and cons of bankruptcy?”

The bankruptcy process can seem opaque. Few people understand how filing for bankruptcy works and it can be hard to get reliable information from those who do know. This lack of information can have the unfortunate side effect of discouraging people who might otherwise benefit from bankruptcy from pursuing it. In an attempt to help demystify the whole process, let’s explore an aspect of the bankruptcy system that is likely unfamiliar to most people: the bankruptcy trustee.

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What are North Carolina’s exemptions ?”

The idea of a creditor not getting paid all it claims it is owed from a bankrupt person may not bring tears to the eyes of many readers.

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Will I lose my property if I file for bankruptcy ?”

Clients and potential clients have frequently asked me if there are actions or statements they should be making or taking or refraining from making or taking in their countenanced or pending bankruptcy cases.

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What is a small business bankruptcy ?”

If you are a small business owner and someone owes you a lot of money, collecting the money—or a substantial portion of it—seems like a no-brainer.