Articles Tagged with law firm

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “I’m owed money by someone that filed bankruptcy. What can I do now?”

Most people understandably assume that if you own a business, whatever it is, you have the ability to seek bankruptcy protection if the need should arise. After all, the bankruptcy code doesn’t allow for judgments on the societal value of the business, all companies are seen as equally able to seek the protection of the bankruptcy system.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are my alternatives to bankruptcy?”

It’s an issue that almost no one pays attention to until you need it: the smooth functioning of the bankruptcy system. Though it seldom grabs headlines, it’s important nonetheless. Recent reports reveal that a number of bankruptcy judgeships are in danger of being eliminated, something that could wreak havoc across the country as a limited number of judges are forced to contend with a massive amount of complicated bankruptcy cases.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 13 bankruptcy?”

Most people see filing for bankruptcy protection as a chance to start clean and are often excited to finally begin putting their financial troubles behind them. Many people would assume that once the bankruptcy court accepts your petition and puts you on a path towards discharge, the hard work is behind you. Unfortunately, that is not always the case, especially for those filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy protection.

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Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Are my 401k and IRA protected in bankruptcy?”

A District Court’s reversal of a bankruptcy court’s application of Section 548(e) of the Bankruptcy Code to a portion of trust assets has bankruptcy insiders breathing a sigh of relief. As Forbes reports, absent the reversal, bankruptcy trustees would have had broad authority to seek to set aside legitimate trust activities in order to seize trust funds for the benefit of creditors.