Articles Tagged with Mooresville

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

Sears, Roebuck & Company, commonly known just as Sears, was founded following the Civil War. Since then, the company has grown and expanded, becoming a popular place for people to shop all across America. Sears has sold a wide variety of items through stores and catalogs, such as clothes, toys, appliances, and even tombstones. As time went on, more and more competition popped up, taking away some of Sears’ clientele. Stores like Walmart and Home Depot became difficult to compete with given their low prices. Additionally, online retailers like Amazon significantly cut into Sears’ customer base. With all of this competition and its decline in sales, Sears has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, according to the New York Times.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 11 Bankruptcy?”

Heritage Home Group, a High Point furniture manufacturer, has filed for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy, according to Business North Carolina. Heritage Home Group filed a Chapter 11 petition with the hope of restructuring the company. They also want to sell their brands, including Thomasville, Broyhill, Hickory Chair, and Maitland-Smith. The decision to file bankruptcy is the result of $280 million in debt that the company is facing. Sales were down 27% from the previous year’s sales. The company does anticipate any changes in their operation while the restructuring takes place.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are the pros and cons of bankruptcy?”

The need to file for bankruptcy can arise for anyone. It does not matter your age, occupation, marital status, or any other qualification you might think of. There might be certain categories of people who are more likely to file for bankruptcy, but there is no guaranteed way to predict who will file for bankruptcy. While you cannot completely predict who might be at risk for needing to file bankruptcy, there are trends that can be observed. The New York Times reports that the number of older Americans who are filing bankruptcy is “booming.”

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What is Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?”

A Chapter 7 bankruptcy that was filed in 2003 has finally ended 15 years later. The Great Northern Paper Co. filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in 2003 and Chief Judge Peter Cary of the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Maine has ordered that the proceeding be closed within 30 days, according to Bangor Daily News. The trustee submitted a certification that the assets of the estate were accounted for and requested that the court discharge the company from other debts and duties.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Can I get rid of student loans by declaring bankruptcy?”

In the United States, the cost of higher education is ever increasing. If you combine that with the difficulty of obtaining a reasonably salaried job after graduation, it is no surprise that student loan debt plagues graduates long after they graduate. An estimate of student loan debt currently owed in the U.S. is over $1.4 trillion dollars. Individuals with student loan debt may eventually fall prey to financial hardships. If an individual is struggling to pay bills and make ends meet, he or she may consider filing for bankruptcy. Student loan debt is often one of the largest debts a person can try to discharge in bankruptcy. However, it is extremely difficult for student loan debt to be discharged. There are specific and limited circumstances in which student loan debt will be discharged in a bankruptcy proceeding.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Do I need an attorney to file bankruptcy?”

The U.S. Supreme Court issued an important decision late last month regarding the ability of some creditors to try and claw back money owed to them by corporations that end up going broke. The ruling overturns a defense used by many companies to shield certain payments made prior to the bankruptcy from being subject to claims by creditors. The decision is important going forward as it is expected to have a significant impact on cases involving complicated financial transfers that had previously been protected from careful scrutiny or claw back by bankruptcy trustees. To learn more about the recent case, keep reading.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “Are my 401k and IRA protected in bankruptcy?”

Normally, arbitration comes up in the context of personal injury cases. A good example is one of the most common instances of arbitration language, which is in nursing home admittance paperwork. The nursing homes include language requiring arbitration, which shields the nursing home from the public, lengthy, expensive and uncertain courtroom litigation process and instead allows them much greater control by requiring all potential plaintiffs to bring their disputes before an arbitrator. This has come under attack in recent years, as many argue that arbitration clauses, especially arbitration clauses that restrict consumers, are unfair.

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Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone answers the question: “What are my alternatives to bankruptcy?”

We like to think that when someone takes the big step of filing for bankruptcy, they do so only when it’s absolutely necessary. The bankruptcy process was created to offer relief to individuals struggling with burdensome debt loads, not to be abused by those simply trying to stall creditors. Though the vast majority of those who file for bankruptcy protection do so as a last resort to avoid financial disaster, there are some who take advantage of aspects of the system for their own benefit.