Our office continues to operate during our regular business hours, which are 8:30 am - 5:30 pm, Monday through Friday, but you can call the office 24 hours a day. We continue to follow all recommendations and requirements of the State of Emergency Stay at Home Order. Consultations are available via telephone or by video conference. The safety of our clients and employees is of the utmost importance and, therefore, in-person meetings are not available at this time except for emergencies or absolutely essential legal services.

Articles Tagged with student loan bankruptcy

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can I get rid of student loans by declaring bankruptcy?”

The Obama administration has put its weight behind a recent proposal calling for changes to be made to bankruptcy rules as they relate to student loans. The plan, proposed by the U.S. Department of Educations, calls for a series of reforms to the student loan system, one of which would ease restrictions on when borrowers would be allowed to bankrupt student loan debt.

Charlotte Bankruptcy Lawyer Bryan W. Stone of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can I get rid of student loans by declaring bankruptcy?”

 

So often in life we limit what we can achieve by self-limiting the possibilities of what we might achieve. The same may be true in a bankruptcy. If a person limits the range of debts one seeks to discharge in a bankruptcy, one may sell oneself short.

Net Cost FY 2006 Charlotte Student Loan Lawyer North Carolina Student Debt AttorneyThe blame isn’t entirely on the individual. Society plays its part. We are told the rules, told what to expect and told what is expected of us. But what happens if what we are told is wrong? So often in bankruptcy—as in life—we should live by the rule of “Buyer Beware.” We should educate ourselves on our options and choose for ourselves the best course in light of our circumstances.

No one is buying anything in bankruptcy, unless purchasing the discharge of debts and, potentially, a new lease on life, is seen as something for which one is willing to pay. No one says going through bankruptcy is easy, but there is an end to it, and whatever leads people into bankruptcy may be worse.

One common elephant in the bankruptcy room is student-loan debt. It weighs heavy because most people believe it is not dischargeable in bankruptcy. Perhaps that is why just .1 percent of consumers with student loans try to seek their discharge through bankruptcy proceedings. This may be a case in which the 99.9 percent are truly to blame.

Continue reading

Contact Information